politics of pleasure a tribute to Robert mapplethorpe, 1990

aids virus, third edition, 1989-90

"The AIDS Virus is clearly the most talked about piece in our collection . . . while this country has the fourth highest concentration of HIV infection in the world, Zimbabweans are still generally reluctant to talk about the disease. The PHSCologram offers us a chance to discuss AIDS in an informal, less threatening way, but nonetheless important way. Zimbabweans are drawn to the technology that the piece evokes. Americans are stunned by the artistic feel, the vivid color and amazing shape of 'the disease’.” 

Anne Marie Macdonald, U.S. Department of State Art in Embassies Program, for exhibition in American Embassy: Ambassador McDonald, Harare, Zimbabwe 1998–2000

AIDS Virus, Third Edition, 1989 -90

Ellen Sandor & (art)n: Stephan Meyers and Craig Ahmer

Dan Sandin and Tom DeFanti, Electronic Visualization Lab, School of Art and Design, University of Illinois at Chicago

Special thanks to Kevin Maginnis & Dr. Roberta Glick

Virtual Photograph/PHSCologram: Cibachrome, Kodalth, Plexiglas

24 x 20 inches

The first computer generated image of the AIDS virus, based on information available in 1987. A colorized CT scan of a person who died of AIDS, named Messiah, was scanned and colorized in the background. The AIDS Virus is an icon of hope and human tragedy, a beacon of art and science, an expression of freedom and democracy, an instrument of healing and collaboration.

 

(art)n's rendering confronts us with a portrait of what the AIDS Virus looks like. At first glance, we do not identify the portrait as a deadly virus. It's a bright, colorful, lively abstraction–a beautiful stranger with it's own will to dazzle and destroy. The collaboration of beauty and destruction within this art work confound both viewers and the artists who created the piece. The AIDS Virus was created by the process of collaboration. It is a dynamic way of working where limits of combined artistic freedom are unknown, but internally democratized by the limits of the technology used to express collective ideas. Every artist who worked on the AIDS Virus contributed to the overall vision–aesthetically, conceptually, and technically, providing a rich collection of ideas and approaches to realizing them that may not emerge when working singularly. The result is a collective artistic statement about how freedom of expression challenges where artists draw the lines when they are working with others and working with new technology and unknowns.

 

papilloma virus, third edition, 1990

A computer rendered image of the papilloma virus, which is spread by physical intimate contact.  When left untreated, this virus can cause several kinds of cancer in women, including cervical cancer.  In the background is a mammogram image of a woman who died of breast cancer, which can be seen in the lower right. 

Papilloma Virus, Third Edition, 1990

Ellen Sandor & (art)n: Stephan Meyers and Craig Ahmer

Donna Cox, NCSA, University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignTom DeFanti and Dan Sandin, Electronic Visualization Lab, University of Illinois at Chicago

PHSCologram: Cibachrome, Kodalith, Plexiglas

24 x 20 inches

 

herpes virus, 1990

A computer rendered image of the herpes virus, which is spread by physical intimate contact. A black and white photograph of a baby who died of the virus was scanned in the background.

The Herpes  Virus shows the general structure of the virus summarizing information gained both by microscopic analysis and more abstract experimentation.

Herpes Virus, 1990

Ellen Sandor & (art)n: Stephan Meyers and Craig Ahmer 

Dr. Bernard Roizman, University of ChicagoDr. Patricia Spear, Northwestern University

PHSCologram: Cibachrome, Kodalith, Plexiglas

24 x 20 inches

 

virtual implants, 1990

Virtual Implants, 1990 (detail)

Ellen Sandor & (art)n

Special thanks to Maggie Rawlings

Vintage PHSColograms: Cibachrome, Kodalith and Plexiglas

2 panels, 24 x 20 inches

 

Real-time 3D scanned female upper torso with the CyberWare scanner.

virtual beauty myth/virtual beast myth

1990

Virtual Beauty Myth/Virtual Beast Myth, 1990 (details)

Ellen Sandor & (art)n

Vintage PHSColograms: Cibachrome, Kodalith and Plexiglas

2 panels, 24 x 20 inches

 

Real-time 3D scanned female and male lower torsos with the CyberWare scanner.